This webpage is reserved for the State of Arizona employees (non-university) in Maricopa County.

 

 

State of Arizona Telework Program

Office of Travel Reduction Programs

100 N. 15th Avenue, Suite 431

Phoenix, Arizona  85007

(602) 542-7433

 

Supervisor Questions & Answers

  1. I have some employees in mind for this program, how do I proceed?

  2. How will I know my employees will be available when I need them?

  3. How do I know they're really working at home?

  4. Will telework make more work for those who stay in the office?

  5. How do I ensure that the home work arrangement is safe, and how is a claim for injury handled?

  6. Won't productivity decline if an individual is not being supervised on site?

  7. How did you measure productivity?

I have some employees in mind for this program, how do I proceed?

Use the telework candidate self-assessment tool to help identify potential teleworkers in your section, meet with them to verify their interest in teleworking.  Once you have verified their interest, schedule some time to sit down and (both of you) complete the CBT and corresponding workbook in the telework training section of this site.  During training, you and your teleworker will read the telework policies and negotiate a formal telework agreement outlining the parameters of your new working relationship.

 

How will I know my employees will be available when I need them?

During training, supervisors and teleworkers will go through several exercises designed to help them plan how they will maintain communication with the office and what will be done to meet contingencies.  If the teleworker is needed, he or she may be asked to come in to the office or join an emergency staff meeting by conference call.

 

How do I know they're really working at home?

Some supervisors express concern that when their employees are teleworking, they won't be able to monitor the work effort.  But when it is approached correctly, supervisors discover they are better able to monitor the work by shifting the focus from how much work the employee looks like he or she is accomplishing to how much he actually is accomplishing. By focusing on the work product instead of the work activity, many supervisors find they are better able to communicate clear expectations to their employees. The resulting agreement on job expectations often leads to increases in employee productivity and job satisfaction. Many supervisors already use this method of management by results.

 

Will telework make more work for those who stay in the office?

No. Before teleworking, supervisors and teleworkers go through several training exercises to help them determine how they will manage their normal office duties without burdening coworkers. When surveyed, coworkers repeatedly respond that telework does not impede the office routine and that the program should be expanded.

 

How do I ensure that the home work arrangement is safe, and how is a claim for injury handled?

It is the employee's responsibility to ensure that their home work area complies with health and safety requirements. Home offices must be clean and free of obstructions. The home must be in compliance with all building codes and free of hazardous materials. Management may deny or cancel the telework agreement based on safety problems in the home. If an employee is injured while at home, worker's compensation law and rules apply. The employee must notify his/her supervisor immediately and complete the necessary documents regarding the injury. Because an injury at home is outside the traditional work place the supervisor must be sure to investigate all reports immediately following notification.

 

Won't productivity decline if an individual is not being supervised on site?

No. Survey results show that both teleworkers and their supervisors believe that teleworking has increased the teleworker's productivity. Productivity increases because employees have fewer distractions and interruptions, work at their personal peak times, and are less stressed due to the absence of the commute.

 

How do you measure productivity?

Surveys are used to measure changes in the working relationships between teleworkers, supervisors and non-teleworking coworkers. Each group is also asked if there was a change in productivity; either in the quality or quantity of work being accomplished by the teleworker.

 

Our surveys consistently show The State of Arizona Telework Program has demonstrated increased productivity from the viewpoint of the supervisor, the teleworker and the non-teleworking coworkers.

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